Anil Dash wrote a list of things we lost on the web back in 2012. Every one of his points have only accelerated during this time.

I badly miss Technorati, I was so excited when I got a profile on it for my sites back in 2005. Anil writes:

… Technorati let you search most of the social web in real-time (though the search tended to be awful slow in presenting results), with tags that worked as hashtags do on Twitter today. You could find the sites that had linked to your content with a simple search, and find out who was talking about a topic regardless of what tools or platforms they were using to publish their thoughts.

But point six is what I miss the most, emphasis added:

In the early days of the social web, there was a broad expectation that regular people might own their own identities by having their own websites, instead of being dependent on a few big sites to host their online identity. In this vision, you would own your own domain name and have complete control over its contents, rather than having a handle tacked on to the end of a huge company’s site. This was a sensible reaction to the realization that big sites rise and fall in popularity, but that regular people need an identity that persists longer than those sites do.

I write a lot about this. I’m thinking I should start doing something about it.