New MyUniSA in Firefox 3.0.14

Are you fed up with constantly checking and deleting messages from your UniSA student email account because of the tiny quota? Turns out you can have your messages redirected to an outside account. I can breathe easier now!

From the UniSA email FAQ:

Students are able to redirect their email to either a University staff account, or to an external account by filling in the required details in the Email Redirection application located at:

https://my.unisa.edu.au/emailredirection

Further information regarding the application is located at:
Email Redirection Further Information

WARNING!

I'm being told by my solicitors I have to dispense with the following warning. By redirecting your university email the burden is on you to keep it secure and backed up. If you don't understand this, do not do it! Read the further information link above for more disclaimers.

Okay, back to the blog post

To make life easier for myself I went ahead and created a new email account with SegPub which I have gigabytes of space free on, then used the form above to redirect my student email to it instead. Now when I have lecturers email me PDFs showing the schematics of entire nuclear reactors it won't blow out my quota and prevent other messages from arriving!

There's also another benefit; by redirecting messages I no longer have to interface at all with the university's Microsoft Exchange services including the dreadful Microsoft Outlook Web Access which only works in Internet Explorer, as I discussed previously.

The IMAP problem

Inevitably the question arises: why didn't I just use IMAP and access my email remotely? I was asked by more than a few people on twitter, and by the technical support guy I called at UniSA.

My problem was I initially went ahead and configured Thunderbird (I upgraded from Mozilla/SeaMonkey Mail) for IMAP access, but unlike POP after I'd downloaded messages they stayed on the server. That's how it's supposed to work, but I wanted to archive local copies of my messages while deleting them from the university's servers, so I'd avoid maxing out my inbox like I was virtually every day before.

On a somewhat related note, I've been having no end of trouble with my university email and with general online student services since resuming full time studies. Perhaps I'm anomaly in the system.