Rubénerd became a blog in 2004, but I didn’t really start writing seriously on it till 2006. That was a decade ago already (wow), so I thought it’d be fun to see what I was talking about exactly ten years ago.

Jamie Oliver

We begin with a quick quote from the celebrity chef I was rather enamoured with at the time:

“If you’re feeling really rubbish, and you have some good food, it just makes you feel good.”

This definitely resonated with me at the time; I’d just come off several weeks of exam preparation eating nothing but instant meals. My saving grace was breakfast cereal; both Jerry Seinfeld and I knew of its awesome power, and so did Jamie judging by the image.

Today, you’d probably not be allowed to admit liking cereal for fear of the anti-gluten mob coming at you with cucumber batons, or whatever it is they eat.

The SwiMP3 player

Forget Treos and iPods with hard drives, in the technology world we had the promise of a revolutionary podcast delivery mechanism. Well okay, it was billed for music, but still:

The New SwiMP3 underwater MP3 player is an incredible audio experience. Imagine listening to hours of your own music during your swim workout.

Naturally, I used it as an opportunity to shamelessly promote the Rubenerd Show at the time:

I have three thoughts on the subject: by having something strapped to your head would that affect your performance, hydrodynamically or through distraction? [..] Would you be able to listen to podcasts and audio magazines, such as… oh I don’t know, say… the Rubenerd Show?

Incidently, the image of the swimmer wearing that weird contraption was easily the most hotlinked, non-anime asset on the site at the time. I didn’t want to enable hotlink protection because people reading the site in their blog aggregators wouldn’t see it, so I just renamed it a few times. Problem solved!

Liberty Versus Security

And a more serious post on security theater. How little have things changed.

It’s a real shame that Australia is following the way of the United States in terms of “national security”. The way I see it, if we radically alter our lives by making them more complicated and difficult, the terrorists have won already.

I remember listening to Lawrence Lessig give a talk on IT Conversations about copyright law and how a restrictive change can be implemented very easily, but it can take a very long time to undo. I think the same applies to this as well.

If I’m still blogging in another ten years, I hope I quote this blog post for some pointless recursive fun.